Catering Assistant Vacancy

Thank you for your interest in applying for the Catering Assistant vacancy.


To find out more about the post of Catering Assistant, please see the following documents:

We recommend downloading Adobe PDFs to your computer and then opening them with Adobe Reader to maintain full compatibility.

You can find out more about Sarum College by reading through our website.

If, after reading the application documents and learning more about the College through the website you decide that you would like to apply for the post, please send the completed application form to Richard Amey at Sarum College by 4pm on Thursday 14 December 2017, which is the deadline for receipt of completed applications.

Our preference is for applications to be completed electronically and sent by email to ramey@dev.sarum.ac.uk. However, if you wish to download and print the documents, please either hand them into Reception (Sarum College is located in Salisbury’s Cathedral Close) or send them by post to the following address:

Richard Amey, Catering Assistant Vacancy, Sarum College, 19 The Close, Salisbury SP1 2EE

Please note that only those applicants who send a completed Sarum College Application Form will be considered.

As a charity, we make every effort to keep our expenditures under control. If you apply and wish to have receipt of your application acknowledged by email, please note this in your message when you send your application documents. If you wish to have a confirmation by post, please enclose a stamped and addressed postcard with your application.

If by the end of Monday 18 December 2017 you have not received an invitation to attend an interview, you may assume that your application has not been successful on this occasion.

The selection process will take place on Monday 18 December 2017.

Only candidates eligible to live and work in the UK should apply. All shortlisted candidates will be asked to provide proof of eligibility to work in the UK at the selection process.

If you wish to discuss the post before you apply, please contact Richard Amey. Email ramey@dev.sarum.ac.uk or telephone 01722 424809.

Liturgy With Older People: Roundtable Discussion

Suzanne Pattle, Jonathan Plows, James Steven, Hazel Trapnell and James Woodward discuss liturgy with older people in this round table discussion, as part of the Liturgy With Older People Pastoral Liturgy Day at Sarum College.

 

Suzanne Pattle is the Vicar of St Michael and All Angels Church in Colehill, Dorset. Jonathan Plows is Associate Priest at St Thomas’s Church, Salisbury. James Steven is Coordinator for the Centre for Liturgy and Worship at Sarum College. Hazel Trapnell is Associate Minister at St Mary’s Church in Stoke Bishop. James Woodward is Principal of Sarum College and Coordinator for the Centre for Human Flourishing.

Further free resources for liturgy and worship with older people, as well as resources relating to dementia and understanding older age are available on the Centre for Human Flourishing resources library.

Finance Manager Vacancy

Thank you for your interest in applying for the Finance Manager vacancy.


To find out more about the post of Finance Manager, please see the following documents:

We recommend downloading Adobe PDFs to your computer and then opening them with Adobe Reader to maintain full compatibility.

You can find out more about Sarum College by reading through our website.

If, after reading the application documents and learning more about the College through the website you decide that you would like to apply for the post, please send the completed application form to Mark Manterfield at Sarum College by 4pm on Wednesday 29 November 2017, which is the deadline for receipt of completed applications.

Our preference is for applications to be completed electronically and sent by email to mdm@dev.sarum.ac.uk. However, if you wish to download and print the documents, please either hand them into Reception (Sarum College is located in Salisbury’s Cathedral Close) or send them by post to the following address:

Mark Manterfield, Finance Manager Post, Sarum College, 19 The Close, Salisbury SP1 2EE

Please note that only those applicants who send a completed Sarum College Application Form will be considered.

As a charity, we make every effort to keep our expenditures under control. If you apply and wish to have receipt of your application acknowledged by email, please note this in your message when you send your application documents. If you wish to have a confirmation by post, please enclose a stamped and addressed postcard with your application.

If by the end of Monday 4 December 2017 you have not received an invitation to attend an interview, you may assume that your application has not been successful on this occasion.

The selection process will take place on Tuesday 5 December 2017.

Only candidates eligible to live and work in the UK should apply. All shortlisted candidates will be asked to provide proof of eligibility to work in the UK at the selection process.

If you wish to discuss the post before you apply, please contact Mark Manterfield. Email mdm@dev.sarum.ac.uk or telephone 01722 424832.

Called to the Countryside

“I feel excited to be training specifically for rural ministry.”

Sharon Boyle started training for ordination in September. She’s breaking new ground as one of the first people on a new Rural Training Pathway at Sarum College, which is supported by the Diocese of Salisbury.

“I was brought up in a churchgoing family in Bournemouth, and was confirmed at All Saints’, Southbourne. Aged 14, however, I went off the rails in many ways and dropped out!

“By 1994, I was a paediatric nurse in Southampton. I kept seeing adverts recruiting people to work with children with HIV in Romania. I eventually put my name forward. As the post was with a Christian charity, I went to church before I went – the first time in years!

“My roommate in Romania, Sally, still a close friend, introduced me to Bible studies, and there was worship at the hospice. Most of all, the children brought me back to God. They were so sick, yet full of faith and trust in Jesus.

“After I met my husband, we settled in Dorset in 1999. We first worshipped at St John’s, Wimborne, then moved to St Michael’s, Colehill, as it’s our parish church. Also, the liturgical tradition there was like coming home for me.

“Since 2010, I’ve been working for Pramacare, a Christian charity which provides home care to elderly people. Our clients are mostly isolated and vulnerable, not least in rural areas.

“I work as a trainer now, and love enabling people to do things they’ve never done. Especially in rural ministry, a priest must be an enabler of lay people.

“When I started discerning a call to ordination, that need for community in the countryside switched me on to the idea of rural ministry. With state social care being cut, the Church has a particular role. Another big task for the Church is bringing the generations together in a divided society.”

Find out more about the unique Rural Training Pathway at Sarum College here and about training for ordained and lay ministry at Sarum more generally here.

This article featured in the Diocese of Salisbury’s newsletter, Grapevine. Reproduced with kind permission.

Sarum Artists Exhibition: Interpretation

This contemporary art exhibition by the Sarum Artists group is based around the theme of interpretation.

Prismatics 4 by Phillip Hutchings

Interpretation is an essential part in the creation of art. It is an entirely subjective process so imposes no boundaries on the creator, or the witness, of the art. Each should gain by their own personal judgement.

The theme of this exhibition was chosen to stimulate discussion and challenge the individual artist and the observer. If you find it stimulating, confrontational or even, confusing, then it has succeeded!

The Sarum Artists group came together in 2006 after completing courses of study at Salisbury. Their aim is to encourage and promote creative work by their members. As a group they include painters, printmakers, sculptors and book-makers: there are no set boundaries.

This exhibition features work by Becca Allen, Ray Brotherton, Teresa Corona, Jenny Frazer, Penny Hewitt, Judith Kemsley, Phillip Hutchings, J.E. Manser, Sally Middleton, Judith Morane-Griffiths, Moira Ross, Jane Shepherd, Nikki Sheppard and Kate Skillings.

The exhibition is free and open daily at Sarum College until Monday 8 January 2018.

Sacred Geometry: Beauty in Biblical Proportions

For those of you who missed this terrific article on the biblical proportions and visual perspectives of Salisbury Cathedral, it’s reprinted below, with Sophie Hacker’s Sacred Geometry course in mind.

There are still a few places, contact Alison Ogden on aogden@dev.sarum.ac.uk or 01722 424826 to book.


Sacred Geometry?

by Richard Deane, vice chairman of the Salisbury Civic Society executive committee

The shelves in Salisbury reference library devoted to the cathedral contain many works of interest, not least a 2003 publication by John Wilkinson entitled ‘Salisbury Cathedral’s Secrets’. This is centred on the premise that numerous detailed elements within the cathedral’s ground plan are derived from systems of proportions contained within the Temple in Jerusalem, and other places and artefacts sacred to Judaism, generating a building which is, in a far more specific way than most of us would realise, a ‘statement about religion’. Adherence to this ‘secret formula’ is so rigid that ‘the cathedral’s lengths and rectangles vary by only two ten thousandths from the biblical proportions’.

This is extremely interesting, even if the author is venturing into arcane areas where not all readers may be willing to follow. This system has of course to be calculated from very precise and painstaking study of the building’s layout, rather than it being something which can be read from the visible structure. There is however another very simple but varying proportion, outside Mr Wilkinson’s remit, which is immediately apparent, and which has a stunning effect on the way we perceive the cathedral.

Simple pythagorean geometry tells us that the diagonal of a square is greater than the side by a factor of the square root of 2, which to three decimal places is 1.414. Lop the corners off the square and form an octagon, and the variation becomes much less. The dimension from corner to opposite corner is greater than that from side to opposite side by a factor of under 1.1. The cathedral’s tower and spire ensemble is of course an octagon sitting on a square, with a transition achieved internally and structurally by four squinch arches (at the level known as Eight Doors) and filled in externally with pinnacles. Thus we have a spire whose width, depending which direction we view it from, varies by less than 10%, while that of the tower below can vary by over 40%.

There is far more than just abstruse mathematics to all this. The practical effect is that viewed from northeast, northwest, southeast or southwest the tower appears much wider than the base of the spire, with the difference made up by pinnacles stepping back in from one to the other. Move round to one of the cardinal points and the spire’s width is virtually unchanged, while the tower becomes much narrower and the pinnacles virtually disappear as individual elements, merging to form a simple silhouette shape which melds spire to tower almost without being noticed. At any intermediate point between these two angles, the proportion and visual effect become different again.

Add in the varying perspective effects which derive from the distance of the viewer from the cathedral, or their height in relation to ground level in the Close, and the result is a structure of almost infinite visual subtlety, accentuated even more by differing weather conditions and angles of the sun, and the endlessly shifting shape of the main body of the cathedral below, as the viewpoint changes. Anyone who knows the building well will be aware of all this, even if they do not consciously think about it.

A first-time visitor may be more struck by it, by the whole series of differing buildings encountered – the tower and spire almost impossibly tall and slender over the low bulk of the rest of the building west from the A36 at Petersfinger, and around it little more than trees, no city apparent, or the brief glimpse northwards coming in from Harnham by the top of Ayleswade Road, that extraordinary vertical  again, and this time the building below stretched eastwards and westwards in a long low horizontal of lead roof, most other features masked by trees or houses – the cathedral’s geometry at its most extreme. Move from there down to the Exeter Street roundabout, and the tower thickens, pinnacles unclench, the elegance remains but supplemented now by a growing strength and power. Further north up Exeter Street, and by the entrance to Bishop Wordsworth’s School the cardinal point proportions have returned, but the building is now so close that it begins to loom, the proximity of five thousand tons of stone pressing down on the crossing piers conferring an almost awesome authority that the more distant building only hints at.

Most singular of all, perhaps, is the cathedral from the northwest, coming in from Wilton. Nothing is seen until the approach to Skew Bridge, when the tower and spire alone appear, suddenly, disembodied, framed in a gap to the right of the bridge. On a summer’s evening, as the structure catches the western light, it can seem for an instant to float, ethereal and other-worldly, only to become barely visible once more as the road turns to the left and other buildings interpose themselves. In recent years this vision has been somewhat disrupted by a cycle path sign placed after the Skew Bridge rebuild of 2004, and by encroaching tree growth, a commentary on how fragile the city’s relationship with its dominant building can be. The effect is still worth looking out for, though.

The ever-changing relationship between tower and spire cannot necessarily be ascribed to a conscious choice by whatever medieval genius designed them – octagonal spires sitting on square towers are very much the norm. What that person can be credited with, however, is the decision to make the tower so much proportionally taller than we generally expect. Other cathedral spires – Chichester, Norwich, the triple at Lichfield – sit on squat towers which act as little more than plinths for them. At Salisbury, perhaps uniquely, the tower is tall enough to take equal billing with the spire. It is the ensemble that counts, one whose design, both in overall form and in the detail of its decoration, it is difficult not to describe as being as close to perfection as a building gets.

In 1995 the Civic Society tentatively suggested to the government that it might consider putting Cathedral and Close forward for World Heritage Site status. The answer that came back was that there wouldn’t be much point, since Unesco felt that it had enough in the way of Sites that were assemblages of historic buildings, and was looking at other types – hence, some years later, the Jurassic Coast. Fair enough, perhaps, but the rationale behind that suggestion remains intact. How one would rate the cathedral if it had remained with its original stumpy lantern tower is an interesting question, but not an important one. Once tower and spire had been added the cathedral became what it remains today, by any reasonable estimation a masterpiece of world art. It is inevitable that many, perhaps most people living close to it end up taking it for granted, and seldom really looking at it. It does no harm to remind ourselves, every now and then, what a stupendous building it actually is.

Reprinted, by kind permission of Richard Deane, from the September 2016 issue of the Salisbury Civic Society magazine

06 November 2017

Bookshop Bestsellers: October 2017

Below is the list of the top ten bestsellers in Sarum College Bookshop in October.

1. Common Worship Lectionary 2017-2018, Church House Publishing £4.99
2. SPCK & Common Worship Lectionary 2018, SPCK £4.99
3. That Other Voice by Graham Turner, DLT £12.99
4. Church Pocket Book and Diary with Lectionary 2018 – Blue, SPCK £9.99
5. The Lost Village by Neil Spring, Quercus Publishing £7.99
6. Re-Imagining the Bible for Today by Anne Claar Thomasson-Rosingh, SCM Press £19.99
7. The Real Advent Calendar, The Meaningful Chocolate Company £3.99
8. Gravetalk: Facilitator’s Guide, Church House Publishing £3.99
9. Reflections for Daily Prayer 2017-2018, Church House Publishing £16.99
10. Responding to the Light: Reflections on Advent, Christmas and Epiphany by Michael Mayne, Canterbury Press Norwich £12.99

Found Out: Transgressive Faith and Sexuality

Join Sarum College Bookshop for the launch of Alison Webster’s new book, Found Out: Transgressive Faith and Sexuality.

Thursday 30 November at 12pm

More than twenty years after writing Found Wanting, her influential critique of Christian teachings about women’s sexuality, Alison Webster explores the experiences of women whose spiritual lives have developed and flourished outside the strict demands and expectations of the traditional Church. Found Out presents these women’s stories and, in the voices of the marginalised and transgressive, discovers the beginnings of a new language for making sense of life, for speaking of God and of spirituality.

This book launch forms part of a day course Alison Webster is leading at Sarum College, Wellbeing, Identity and Spirituality – a creative day of theological exploration and reflection on who we are and how we flourish.

“Theology for Alison Webster is not a sport or hobby. It is survival. Driven by the hard realities of experience and the imperative of injustice, she fearlessly dusts off the sources, norms and ends of theological imagining to reconstruct liberation and hope for those whose voice is seldom heard. If the Church, poised on its various tightropes, is trying to balance so hard that it becomes incapable of moving, then this is a timely book that interrupts our paralysis in the name of God, calling us out, like Lazarus, to find ourselves loved to the point of tears. – Mark Oakley, Chancellor of St Paul’s Cathedral

Free and open to all, refreshments provided
To book telephone 01722 326899 or email bookshop@dev.sarum.ac.uk

Book of the Month: November 2017

Christmas Through the Keyhole by Derek Tidball

Human beings need to tell their stories and often the best of these are put to music. Sometimes we need help to see beyond the immediate into a wider and more imaginative horizon. Too easily we find ourselves distracted and even bored by religion and its meaning for us. This is as true for those of us who belong to the Church as for those who sit curiously on the outside straining their eyes to look, perhaps at what the Gospel may have to say about their human flourishing.

Derek Tidball is a skilled, creative and innovative communicator. All these skills are put to work in this book of meditations that run from 3 December through to 6 January. The focus is Luke’s songs recorded in that narrative as the songs of Mary, Zechariah, Simeon and the Angels at Bethlehem.

The themes of: the hope of the needy, the Redeemer of the world, the joy of the earth, the light of the nations and the splendour of creation are taken and explored within five sections each with a daily reflection. The book invites the reader to see and hear the songs of the birth of Christ as keyholes through which we can glimpse extraordinary and transformative things. Scripture is attended to carefully and broken open within the context of our complex and contradictory lives. We are challenged to consider and reconsider what kind of love might lie behind the doors which need opening for our illumination- to fill our minds with truth from God and put that love to work in our life.

You will be refreshed and enlarged through these pages. Read them carefully and explore how attention to the gracious promise of God might nurture wisdom and thankfulness.

Reviewed by Canon James Woodward, Principal of Sarum College

Christmas Through the Keyhole is just £6 until November 30th 2017 (RRP £6.99), available from our online shop + £2.50 postage, or mail order by phoning 01722 326899 or emailing bookshop@dev.sarum.ac.uk.